Civil War Volume III (History of England) Read & Download ´ 108

Read & Download Civil War Volume III (History of England)

Civil War Volume III (History of England) Read & Download ´ 108 Ð [Download] ➾ Civil War Volume III (History of England) Author Peter Ackroyd – Eyltransferservices.co.uk In Civil War Peter Ackroyd continues his dazzling account of England's history beginning with the progress south of the Scottish king JaIn Civil War Peter Ackroyd continues his dazzling account of England's history beginning with the progress Civil War Epubsouth of the Scottish king James VI who on the death of Elizabeth I became the first Stuart king of England and ends with the deposition and flight into exile of his grandson James II The Stuart dynasty brought together the two nations of England and Scotland into one realm albeit a realm still marked by political divisions that echo to this day More importantly perhaps the Stuart era was marked by the cruel depredations of civil war and the killing of a king Ackroyd paints a vivid portrait of James I and his heirs Shrewd and opinionated the new King was elouent on matters as diverse as theology witchcraft and the abuses of tobacco but his attitude to the English parliament sowed the seeds of the division that would split the country in the reign of his hapless heir Charles I Ackroyd offers a brilliant warts and all portrayal of Charles's nemesis Oliver Cromwell Parliament's great military leader and England's only dictator who began his career as a political liberator but ended it as much of a despot as 'that man of blood' the king he executedEngland's turbulent seventeenth century is vividly laid out before us but so too is the cultural and social life of the period notable for its extraordinarily rich literature including Shakespeare's late masterpieces Jacobean tragedy the poetry of John Donne and Milton and Thomas Hobbes' great philosophical treatise Leviathan Civil War also gives us a very real sense of the lives of ordinary English men and women lived out against a backdrop of constant disruption and uncertaintyPRAISE FOR THE HISTORY OF ENGLAND SERIESAckroyd's trademark insight and wit and the glorious interconnectedness of all things permeate each page ObserverAckroyd writes with such lightly worn erudition and a deceptive ease that he never fails to engage Daily TelegraphIn pages of limpid detail Ackroyd makes history accessible to the layman Ian Thomson I. This is the 3rd volume of Ackroyd’s History of England Usually with multi volume histories each epoch is allocated to a specialist author There might be advantages to the whole project being undertaken by a general historian but not in this instancePerhaps because the series covers than a thousand years the author chooses to focus those events and actors who are the most dramatic This is clear from the chapter headings 15 The Crack of Doom 25 The Gates of Hell etc In principle this could work well enough but we still need the main structure of the times Fifty chronological chapters whirl past like a pathe newsreel There is less analysis of underlying causes or reflection on the meaning of eventsLiberal use is made of contemporary sources cited verbatim Again this might give a feel of the period but some sections are almost stitched together from uotations with a linking loop hooked in from the author The significant and defining is mixed up with the trivial thus Henrietta Maria’s duvets are in the wash with the Thirty Years’ WarThis felt to me like Peter Ackroyd was seeking to distance himself from the heavy studies of the 17th century perhaps seeking to be entertaining or popular Obviously it depends to a degree on what you want but I am not sure who this will satisfy If the reader really has very little knowledge of the period Civil War will be difficult to follow On the other hand the serious student will find it shallow and superficial Also in recent years a number of excellent histories have appeared

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EndentIn Civil War Peter Ackroyd continues his dazzling account of England's history beginning with the progress south of the Scottish king James VI who on the death of Elizabeth I became the first Stuart king of England and ends with the deposition and flight into exile of his grandson James II The Stuart dynasty brought together the two nations of England and Scotland into one realm albeit a realm still marked by political divisions that echo to this day More importantly perhaps the Stuart era was marked by the cruel depredations of civil war and the killing of a king Ackroyd paints a vivid portrait of James I and his heirs Shrewd and opinionated the new King was elouent on matters as diverse as theology witchcraft and the abuses of tobacco but his attitude to the English parliament sowed the seeds of the division that would split the country in the reign of his hapless heir Charles I Ackroyd offers a brilliant warts and all portrayal of Charles's nemesis Oliver Cromwell Parliament's great military leader and England's only dictator who began his career as a political liberator but ended it as much of a despot as 'that man of blood' the king he executedEngland's turbulent seventeenth century is vividly laid out before us but so too is the cultural and social life of the period notable for its extraordinarily rich literature including Shakespeare's late masterpieces Jacobean tragedy the poetry of John Donne and Milton and Thomas Hobbes' great philosophical treatise Leviathan Civil War also gives us a very real sense of the lives of ordinary English men and women lived out against a backdrop of constant disruption and uncertaintyPRAISE FOR THE HISTORY OF ENGLAND SERIESAckroyd's trademark insight and wit and the glorious interconnectedness of all things permeate each page ObserverAckroyd writes with such lightly worn erudition and a deceptive ease that he never fails to engage Daily TelegraphIn pages of limpid detail Ackroyd makes history accessible to the layman Ian Thomson Independe. As perhaps befits an author so associated with London this whistle stop tour of the 17th century does tend to focus its mostly top down narrative history on London and the court much as was my school history of 50 years ago Missing from my high school rush through the ages though was Ackroyd’s recognition that Restoration comedy was a tad vivid in its themes and language than was apparent in my A level syllabus “The League of Gentleman Live” than “Paradise Lost”

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Civil War Volume III History of EnglandNdependentIn Civil War Peter Ackroyd continues his dazzling account of England's history beginning with the progress south of the Scottish king James VI who on the death of Elizabeth I became the first Stuart king of England and ends with the deposition and flight into exile of his grandson James II The Stuart dynasty brought together the two nations of England and Scotland into one realm albeit a realm still marked by political divisions that echo to this day More importantly perhaps the Stuart era was marked by the cruel depredations of civil war and the killing of a king Ackroyd paints a vivid portrait of James I and his heirs Shrewd and opinionated the new King was elouent on matters as diverse as theology witchcraft and the abuses of tobacco but his attitude to the English parliament sowed the seeds of the division that would split the country in the reign of his hapless heir Charles I Ackroyd offers a brilliant warts and all portrayal of Charles's nemesis Oliver Cromwell Parliament's great military leader and England's only dictator who began his career as a political liberator but ended it as much of a despot as 'that man of blood' the king he executedEngland's turbulent seventeenth century is vividly laid out before us but so too is the cultural and social life of the period notable for its extraordinarily rich literature including Shakespeare's late masterpieces Jacobean tragedy the poetry of John Donne and Milton and Thomas Hobbes' great philosophical treatise Leviathan Civil War also gives us a very real sense of the lives of ordinary English men and women lived out against a backdrop of constant disruption and uncertaintyPRAISE FOR THE HISTORY OF ENGLAND SERIESAckroyd's trademark insight and wit and the glorious interconnectedness of all things permeate each page ObserverAckroyd writes with such lightly worn erudition and a deceptive ease that he never fails to engage Daily TelegraphIn pages of limpid detail Ackroyd makes history accessible to the layman Ian Thomson Indep. Peter Ackroyd has written a very informative account of most of the Stuart Period starting with James I in 1603 and ending with the Glorious Revolution in 1688 The reigns of William and Mary and Anne are excluded from this book and are included instead in the next volume in the series The book has been written in a very readable style that makes it accessible to the layman As well as focusing on the kings and leading statesmen the author has cleverly interspersed the historical narrative with shorter chapters on key thinkers and writers of the time such as Bacon Milton Hobbes Newton and Pepys which both adds to the readability and brings out the cultural achievements of the timeAn excellent read for anyone interested in the Stuarts